American English

Definition of damp adjective from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

      

    damp

     adjective
    adjective
    NAmE//dæmp//
     
    (damper, dampest)
     
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  1.  slightly wet, often in a way that is unpleasant The cottage was cold and damp. It feels damp in here. damp clothes Wipe the surface with a damp cloth. Thesauruswetmoist damp soaked drenched saturatedThese words all describe things covered with or full of liquid, especially water.wet covered with or full of liquid, especially water:The car skidded on the wet road. You'll get wet (= in the rain) if you go out now.moist slightly wet, often in a way that is pleasant or useful:a rich, moist cakedamp slightly wet, often in a way that is unpleasant:The cabin was cold and damp.soaked (somewhat informal) very wet:You're soaked through! (= completely wet)drenched very wet:We got caught in the storm and were drenched to the skin.soaked or drenched?Both of these words can be used with with or in:soaked/drenched with/in sweat/blood. Soaked, but not usually drenched, can also be used before a noun:their soaked clothes their drenched clothessaturated very wet:The ground is completely saturated: it would be pointless to plant anything.Patterns wet/moist/damp/soaked/drenched/saturated with something soaked/drenched in something somebody's coat/shirt/shoes/clothes/hair is/are wet/damp/soaked/drenched wet/moist/damp/saturated ground/soil
  2.  
    adverb The blouse clung damply to her skin.
See the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary entry: damp