American English

Definition of jump verb from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

      

    jump

     verb
    verb
    NAmE//dʒʌmp//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they jump
     
    he / she / it jumps
     
    past simple jumped
     
    -ing form jumping
     
     
    jump to other results
    move off/to ground
  1. 1 [intransitive] to move quickly off the ground or away from a surface by pushing yourself with your legs and feet “Quick, jump!” he shouted. + adv./prep. to jump into the air/over a wall/into the water The children were jumping up and down with excitement. She jumped down from the chair. The pilot jumped from the burning plane (= with a parachute ). + noun She has jumped 7.5 feet.
  2. pass over something
  3. 2[transitive] to pass over something by jumping synonym leap jump something Can you jump that gate? His horse fell as it jumped the last hurdle. jump something + adv./prep. I jumped my horse over all the fences.
  4. move quickly
  5. 3[intransitive] + adv./prep. to move quickly and suddenly He jumped to his feet when they called his name. She jumped up and ran out of the room. Do you want a ride? Jump in.
  6. 4[intransitive] to make a sudden movement because of surprise, fear, or excitement A loud bang made me jump. Her heart jumped when she heard the news.
  7. 5 [intransitive] to take quick action; to do something immediately When the boss gives an order, you better jump! + adv./prep. When someone criticized my work, Gordon jumped to my defense (= was quick to defend me).
  8. increase
  9. 6[intransitive] to rise suddenly by a large amount synonym leap jump by… Prices jumped by 60% last year. jump (from…) (to…) Sales jumped from $2.7 billion to $3.5 billion.
  10. change suddenly
  11. 7 [intransitive] jump (around) (from something to something) to change suddenly from one subject to another I couldn't follow the talk because he kept jumping around from one topic to another. The story then jumps from her childhood in New York to her first visit to London.
  12. leave out
  13. 8[transitive] jump something to leave out something and pass to a further point or stage You seem to have jumped several steps in the argument.
  14. of machine/device
  15. 9[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) to move suddenly and unexpectedly, especially out of the correct position The needle jumped across the dial. The film jumped during projection.
  16. attack
  17. 10[transitive, intransitive] jump (on) somebody (informal) to attack someone suddenly The thieves jumped him in a dark alleyway.
  18. vehicle
  19. 11 [transitive] jump something to get on a vehicle very quickly to jump a bus
  20. 12 = jump-start
  21. be lively
  22. 13be jumping [intransitive] (informal) to be very lively The bar's jumping tonight.
  23. Idioms
    be jumping up and down (informal)
     
    jump to other results
    to be very angry or excited about something The local residents are jumping up and down complaining about the noise.
    climb/jump on the bandwagon (informal) (disapproving)
     
    jump to other results
    to join others in doing something that is becoming fashionable because you hope to become popular or successful yourself politicians eager to jump on the environmental bandwagon In the U.S., political parades often included a band on a wagon. Political leaders would join them in the hope of winning popular support.
    climb/jump on the bandwagon (informal) (disapproving)
     
    jump to other results
    to join others in doing something that is becoming fashionable because you hope to become popular or successful yourself politicians eager to jump on the environmental bandwagon In the U.S., political parades often included a band on a wagon. Political leaders would join them in the hope of winning popular support.
    jump down somebody's throat (informal)
     
    jump to other results
    to react very angrily to someone
    jump the gun
     
    jump to other results
    to do something too soon, before the right time
    (go) jump in the lake (informal)
     
    jump to other results
    a rude way of telling someone to go away When he asked me for more money, I told him to jump in the lake.
    jump in with both feet
     
    jump to other results
    to get deeply involved with something that you are enthusiastic about When he saw the opportunities for volunteer work, he jumped in with both feet.
    jump out of your skin (informal)
     
    jump to other results
    to move violently because of a sudden shock
    jump/skip rope
     
    jump to other results
    to jump over a rope that is held at both ends by you or by two other people and is passed again and again over your head and under your feet She likes to jump rope as a warm-up. see also jump rope
    1. 1to leave the ship on which you are serving, without permission
    2. 2to leave an organization that you belong to, suddenly and unexpectedly
    jump through hoops
     
    jump to other results
    to do something difficult or complicated in order to achieve something
    jump/be thrown in/into the deep end (informal)
     
    jump to other results
    to start or be made to start a new and difficult activity that you are not prepared for Medical interns are thrown in the deep end in their first jobs.
    jump/leap to conclusions, jump/leap to the conclusion that…
     
    jump to other results
    to make a decision about someone or something too quickly, before you know or have thought about all the facts There I go again—jumping to conclusions.
    jump to it (also hop to it) (informal)
     
    jump to other results
    used to tell someone to hurry and do something quickly
    jump the tracks
     
    jump to other results
    (of a train) to leave the tracks suddenly
    Phrasal Verbsjump at somethingjump injump on somebodyjump out at somebody
See the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary entry: jump