American English

Definition of love verb from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

     

    love

     verb
    verb
    NAmE//lʌv//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they love
     
    he / she / it loves
     
    past simple loved
     
    -ing form loving
     
     
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    feel affection
  1. 1 love somebody/something (not used in the progressive tenses) to have very strong feelings of affection for someone I love you. If you love each other, why not get married? Her much-loved brother lay dying of cancer. He had become a well-loved member of our club. Relatives need time to grieve over loved ones they have lost. to love your country
  2. like/enjoy
  3. 2 to like or enjoy something very much synonym adore love something I really love summer evenings. I just love it when you bring me presents! He loved the way she smiled. Ilove it in Spain (= I like the life there). It was one of his best-loved songs. (ironic) You're going to love this.They've changed their minds again. love doing something My dad loves going to baseball games. love to do something I love to go out dancing. love somebody/something to do something He loved her to sing to him. Thesauruslikelove be fond of something be crazy about something adoreThese words all mean to find something pleasant, attractive, or satisfactory, or to enjoy something.like to find something pleasant, attractive, or satisfactory; to enjoy something:Do you like their new house? I like to see them enjoying themselves.love to like or enjoy something very much:He loved the way she smiled.be fond of something (somewhat formal) to like or enjoy something, especially something you have liked or enjoyed for a long time:We were fond of the house and didn't want to leave.be crazy about something (informal) to be very enthusiastic or excited about something:Rick is crazy about football. She's not crazy about being told what to do.adore (informal) to like or enjoy something very much:He adores working with children.love or adore?Adore is more informal than love, and is used to express a stronger feeling.Patterns to like/love/be fond of/be crazy about/adore doing something to like/love to do something to like/love something very much I like/love/adore >it>here/there/when… to like/love/adore the way somebody does something to really like/love/adore somebody/something to be really fond of/crazy about something
  4. 3 would love used to say that you would very much like something love to do something Come on Rory, the kids would love to hear you sing. I haven't been to Brazil, but I'd love to go. love for somebody/something to do something I'd love for her to come and live with us. love something “Cigarette?” “I'd love one, but I've just quit.”
See the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary entry: love