Definition of seat noun from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

      

    seat

     noun
    noun
    NAmE//sit//
     
     
    jump to other results
    place to sit
  1. 1a place where you can sit, for example a chair She sat back in her seat. He put his bags on the seat behind him. Please take a seat (= sit down). Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seats (= sit down). a window/corner seat (= one near a window/in a corner) a child seat (= for a child in a car) Would you prefer a window seat or an aisle seat? (= on a plane) We used the branch of an old tree as a seat. We all filed back to our seats in silence. see also back seat, bucket seat, ejection seat, hot seat, love seat, passenger seat
  2. -seater
  3. 2 (in nouns and adjectives) with the number of seats mentioned a ten-seater minibus
  4. part of chair
  5. 3the part of a chair, etc. on which you actually sit a steel chair with a plastic seat
  6. in plane/train/theater
  7. 4 a place where you pay to sit in a plane, train, theater, etc. to reserve a seat (= for a concert, etc.) There are no seats left on that flight.
  8. official position
  9. 5 an official position as a member of a council, committee, etc. a seat on the city council/in Congress to win/lose a seat (= in an election) The majority of seats on the board will be held by business representatives.
  10. town/city
  11. 6seat of something (formal) a place where people are involved in a particular activity, especially a city that has a university or the offices of a government Washington is the seat of government of the U.S. a university town renowned as a seat of learning
  12. part of body
  13. 7(especially formal) the part of the body on which a person sits synonym buttocks
  14. part of pants
  15. 8 the part of a pair of pants that covers a person's seat
  16. Thesaurussitsit down be seated have/take a seat perchThese words all mean to rest your weight on your bottom with your back upright, for example on a chair.sit to rest your weight on your bottom with your back upright, for example on a chair:May I sit here? Sit still, will you! Sit is usually used with an adverb or a prepositional phrase to show where or how someone sits, but sometimes another phrase or clause is used to show what someone does while they are sitting:We sat talking for hours.sit down to move from a standing position to a sitting position:Please sit down.be seated (formal) to be sitting:She was seated at the head of the table. Be seated is often used as a formal way of inviting someone to sit down:Please be seated.have/take a seat to sit down Have/Take a seat is used especially as a polite way of inviting someone to sit down:Please have a seat.perch (somewhat informal) to sit on something, especially on the edge of something:She perched herself on the edge of the bed. Perch is always used with an adverb or prepositional phrase to show where someone is perching.Patterns to sit/sit down/be seated/have a seat/take a seat/perch on something to sit/sit down/be seated/have a seat/take a seat in somethingIdioms
    be in the catbird seat
     
    jump to other results
    to have an advantage over other people or be in control of a situation
    be in the driver's seat
     
    jump to other results
    to be the person in control of a situation
    (fly) by the seat of your pants(informal)
     
    jump to other results
    to act without careful thought and without a plan that you have made in advance, hoping that you will be lucky and be successful synonym wing it
    on the edge of your seat
     
    jump to other results
    very excited and giving your full attention to something The game had the crowd on the edge of their seats. I was on the edge of my seat waiting to find out what happened next.
    take a back seat
     
    jump to other results
    to allow someone else to play a more active and important role in a particular situation than you do Many managers take a back seat and leave recruitment to specialists.
See the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary entry: seat