Definition of smash verb from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

      

    smash

     verb
    verb
    NAmE//smæʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they smash
     
    he / she / it smashes
     
    past simple smashed
     
    -ing form smashing
     
     
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    break
  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] smash (something) to break something, or to be broken, violently and noisily into many pieces Several windows had been smashed. He smashed the radio to pieces. The glass bowl smashed into a thousand pieces.
  2. hit very hard
  3. 2[intransitive, transitive] to move with a lot of force against something solid; to make something do this + adv./prep. the sound of waves smashing against the rocks The car smashed into a tree. smash something + adv./prep. Mark smashed his fist down on the desk. Thesauruscrashslam collide smash wreckThese are all words that can be used when something, especially a vehicle, hits something else very hard and is damaged or destroyed.crash (somewhat informal) to hit an object or another vehicle, causing damage; to make a vehicle do this:I was terrified that the plane would crash.slam (something) into/against somebody/something to crash into something with a lot of force; to make something do this:The car skidded and slammed into a tree.collide (somewhat formal) (of two vehicles or people) to crash into each other; (of a vehicle or person) to crash into someone or something else:The car and the van collided head-on in thick fog.smash (somewhat informal) to crash into something with a lot of force; to make something do this; to crash a car:The thieves smashed a stolen car through the store's display.crash, slam, or smash?Crash is used especially to talk about vehicles and can be used without a preposition:We're going to crash, aren't we?In this meaning slam and smash always take a preposition:We're going to slam/smash, aren't we?They are used for a much wider range of things than just vehicles. Crash can also be used for other things, if used with a preposition:She turned the corner in the hallway and crashed into the soda machine.wreck to crash a vehicle and damage it very badlyPatterns two vehicles crash/collide two vehicles/people/things crash/slam/smash >into each other> to crash/smash/wreck a car
  4. 3[transitive, intransitive] to hit something very hard and break it, in order to get through it smash something + adv./prep. They had to smash holes in the ice. The elephant smashed its way through the trees. smash something + adj. We had to smash the door open. + adv./prep. They had smashed through a glass door to get in.
  5. 4[transitive] smash something/somebody (+ adv./prep.) to hit something or someone very hard synonym slam He smashed the ball into the goal.
  6. destroy/defeat
  7. 5[transitive] smash something/somebody to destroy, defeat, or put an end to something or someone Police say they have smashed a major drugs ring. She has smashed the world record (= broken it by a large amount).
  8. crash vehicle
  9. 6[transitive] smash something (up) to crash a vehicle He's smashed (up) his new car. Thesauruscrashslam collide smash wreckThese are all words that can be used when something, especially a vehicle, hits something else very hard and is damaged or destroyed.crash (somewhat informal) to hit an object or another vehicle, causing damage; to make a vehicle do this:I was terrified that the plane would crash.slam (something) into/against somebody/something to crash into something with a lot of force; to make something do this:The car skidded and slammed into a tree.collide (somewhat formal) (of two vehicles or people) to crash into each other; (of a vehicle or person) to crash into someone or something else:The car and the van collided head-on in thick fog.smash (somewhat informal) to crash into something with a lot of force; to make something do this; to crash a car:The thieves smashed a stolen car through the store's display.crash, slam, or smash?Crash is used especially to talk about vehicles and can be used without a preposition:We're going to crash, aren't we?In this meaning slam and smash always take a preposition:We're going to slam/smash, aren't we?They are used for a much wider range of things than just vehicles. Crash can also be used for other things, if used with a preposition:She turned the corner in the hallway and crashed into the soda machine.wreck to crash a vehicle and damage it very badlyPatterns two vehicles crash/collide two vehicles/people/things crash/slam/smash >into each other> to crash/smash/wreck a car
  10. in tennis, etc.
  11. 7[transitive] smash something to hit a high ball downward and very hard over the net
  12. Phrasal Verbssmash somethingdownsmash somethinginsmash somethingup
See the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary entry: smash