Definition of abandon verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    abandon

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//əˈbændən//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈbændən//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they abandon
    BrE BrE//əˈbændən//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈbændən//
     
    he / she / it abandons
    BrE BrE//əˈbændənz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈbændənz//
     
    past simple abandoned
    BrE BrE//əˈbændənd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈbændənd//
     
    past participle abandoned
    BrE BrE//əˈbændənd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈbændənd//
     
    -ing form abandoning
    BrE BrE//əˈbændənɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈbændənɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  to leave somebody, especially somebody you are responsible for, with no intention of returning abandon somebody The baby had been abandoned by its mother. People often simply abandon their pets when they go abroad. abandon somebody to something The study showed a deep fear among the elderly of being abandoned to the care of strangers.
  2. 2  to leave a thing or place, especially because it is impossible or dangerous to stay synonym leave abandon something Snow forced many drivers to abandon their vehicles. He gave the order to abandon ship (= to leave the ship because it was sinking). abandon something to somebody/something They had to abandon their lands to the invading forces.
  3. 3  abandon something to stop doing something, especially before it is finished; to stop having something They abandoned the match because of rain. She abandoned hope of any reconciliation. We had to abandon any further attempt at negotiation.
  4. 4to stop supporting or helping somebody; to stop believing in something abandon somebody The country abandoned its political leaders after the war. abandon something By 1930 he had abandoned his Marxist principles.
  5. 5abandon yourself to something (literary) to feel an emotion so strongly that you can feel nothing else He abandoned himself to despair.
  6. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French abandoner, from a- (from Latin ad ‘to, at’) + bandon ‘control’ (related to ban). The original sense was ‘bring under control’, later ‘give in to the control of, surrender to’ (sense (5)).Extra examples He abandoned the army for politics. She abandoned her teaching career in favour of sport. The car was found abandoned in a nearby town. The government does not propose to abandon the project altogether. The plans for reform were quietly abandoned. The town had been hastily abandoned. This principle has now been effectively abandoned. Traditional policies were simply abandoned. He gave the order to abandon ship. I have abandoned hope of any reconciliation. They had to abandon their lands and property to the invading forces. They were forced to abandon the game because of rain. Work on the new building was finally abandoned.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: abandon

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