Definition of accost verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

accost

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//əˈkɒst//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈkɔːst//
 
, NAmE//əˈkɑːst//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they accost
BrE BrE//əˈkɒst//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈkɔːst//
 
, NAmE//əˈkɑːst//
 
he / she / it accosts
BrE BrE//əˈkɒsts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈkɔːsts//
 
, NAmE//əˈkɑːsts//
 
past simple accosted
BrE BrE//əˈkɒstɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈkɔːstɪd//
 
, NAmE//əˈkɑːstɪd//
 
past participle accosted
BrE BrE//əˈkɒstɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈkɔːstɪd//
 
, NAmE//əˈkɑːstɪd//
 
-ing form accosting
BrE BrE//əˈkɒstɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈkɔːstɪŋ//
 
, NAmE//əˈkɑːstɪŋ//
 
 
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accost somebody (formal) to go up to somebody and speak to them, especially in a way that is rude or threatening She was accosted in the street by a complete stranger. Word Origin late 16th cent. (originally in the sense ‘lie or go alongside’): from French accoster, from Italian accostare, from Latin ad- ‘to’ + costa ‘rib, side’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: accost