Definition of acquit verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    acquit

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//əˈkwɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈkwɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they acquit
    BrE BrE//əˈkwɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈkwɪt//
     
    he / she / it acquits
    BrE BrE//əˈkwɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈkwɪts//
     
    past simple acquitted
    BrE BrE//əˈkwɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈkwɪtɪd//
     
    past participle acquitted
    BrE BrE//əˈkwɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈkwɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form acquitting
    BrE BrE//əˈkwɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈkwɪtɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1acquit somebody (of something) to decide and state officially in court that somebody is not guilty of a crime The jury acquitted him of murder. Both defendants were acquitted. She was acquitted on all charges. He was acquitted on the grounds of insufficient evidence. opposite convict
  2. 2acquit yourself well, badly, etc. (formal) to perform or behave well, badly, etc. He acquitted himself brilliantly in the exams. More Like This Consonant-doubling verbs bob, club, dub, grab, rub, sob, throb kid, nod, pad, plod, prod, shred, skid, thud beg, blog, bug, drag, drug, flag, hug, jog, log, mug, nag, plug bar, confer, infer, occur, prefer, refer, star, stir, transfer acquit, admit, allot, chat, clot, commit, jut, knit, pat, regret, rot, spot, submit (in British English:) appal, cancel, channel, control, counsel, enrol, equal, excel, fuel, fulfil, label, level, marvel, model, pedal, quarrel, signal, travelSee worksheet.
  3. Word Origin Middle English (originally in the sense ‘pay a debt, discharge a liability’): from Old French acquiter, from medieval Latin acquitare ‘pay a debt’, from ad- ‘to’ + quitare ‘set free’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: acquit