Definition of acrid adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

acrid

 adjective
adjective
BrE BrE//ˈækrɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈækrɪd//
 
Taste of food
 
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having a strong, bitter smell or taste that is unpleasant synonym pungent acrid smoke from burning tyres The fog was yellow and acrid and bit at the back of the throat. Synonymsbitterpungent sour acrid sharp acidThese words all describe a strong, unpleasant taste or smell.bitter (of a taste or smell) strong and usually unpleasant; (of food or drink) having a bitter taste.pungent (of a smell or taste) strong and usually unpleasant; (of food or smoke) having a pungent smell or taste:the pungent smell of burning rubbersour (of a taste) bitter like the taste of a lemon or of fruit that is not ripe; (of food or drink) having a sour taste:Too much pulp produces a sour wine.acrid (of a smell or taste) strong and unpleasant; (of smoke) having an acrid smell:acrid smoke from burning tyressharp (of a taste or smell) strong and slightly bitter; (of food or drink) having a sharp taste:The cheese has a distinctively sharp taste.acid (of a taste or smell) bitter, like the taste of a lemon or of fruit that is not ripe; (of food or drink) having an acid taste.which word? A bitter taste is usually unpleasant, but some people enjoy the bitter flavour of coffee or chocolate. No other word can describe this flavour. A sharp or pungent flavour is more strong than unpleasant, especially when describing cheese. Sharp, sour and acid all describe the taste of a lemon or a fruit that is not ripe. An acrid smell is strong and unpleasant, especially the smell of smoke or burning, but not the smell of food.Patterns a(n) bitter/​pungent/​sour/​acrid/​sharp/​acid taste/​flavour a(n) bitter/​pungent/​acrid/​sharp/​acid smell/​odour a(n) bitter/​sour/​sharp/​acid fruit pungent/​sharp cheese pungent/​acrid smoke See related entries: Taste of food Word Origin early 18th cent.: formed irregularly from Latin acer, acri- ‘sharp, pungent’ + -id, probably influenced by acid.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: acrid