Definition of administer verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    administer

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ədˈmɪnɪstə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmɪnɪstər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they administer
    BrE BrE//ədˈmɪnɪstə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmɪnɪstər//
     
    he / she / it administers
    BrE BrE//ədˈmɪnɪstəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmɪnɪstərz//
     
    past simple administered
    BrE BrE//ədˈmɪnɪstəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmɪnɪstərd//
     
    past participle administered
    BrE BrE//ədˈmɪnɪstəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmɪnɪstərd//
     
    -ing form administering
    BrE BrE//ədˈmɪnɪstərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmɪnɪstərɪŋ//
     
    Medical equipment
     
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  1. 1[often passive] administer something to manage and organize the affairs of a company, an organization, a country, etc. synonym manage to administer a charity/fund/school the high cost of administering medical services The pension funds are administered by commercial banks.
  2. 2administer something to make sure that something is done fairly and in the correct way to administer justice/the law The questionnaire was administered by trained interviewers.
  3. 3administer something (to somebody) (formal) to give or to provide something, especially in a formal way The teacher has the authority to administer punishment. A taxi driver administered first aid to the victims. The priest was called to administer the last rites.
  4. 4[often passive] (formal) to give drugs, medicine, etc. to somebody administer something Police believe his wife could not have administered the poison. administer something to somebody The dose was administered to the child intravenously. Wordfinderadminister, capsule, dispense, dose, ill, inhaler, medicine, medication, pharmacy, placebo See related entries: Medical equipment
  5. 5administer a kick, a punch, etc. (to somebody/something) (formal) to kick or to hit somebody/something He administered a severe blow to his opponent's head.
  6. Word Origin late Middle English: via Old French from Latin administrare, from ad- ‘to’ + ministrare ‘wait upon’, from minister ‘servant’, from minus ‘less’.Extra examples Bishops came before the Pope and justice was administered by him in person. It is the function of the courts to administer the laws which Parliament has enacted. The charity is administered by a 20-strong management committee. The country has to face up to the high cost of administering medical services. The team is responsible for administering the tests and marking the papers.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: administer