Definition of admire verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    admire

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ədˈmaɪə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmaɪər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they admire
    BrE BrE//ədˈmaɪə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmaɪər//
     
    he / she / it admires
    BrE BrE//ədˈmaɪəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmaɪərz//
     
    past simple admired
    BrE BrE//ədˈmaɪəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmaɪərd//
     
    past participle admired
    BrE BrE//ədˈmaɪəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmaɪərd//
     
    -ing form admiring
    BrE BrE//ədˈmaɪərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈmaɪərɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  to respect somebody for what they have done or to respect their qualities admire somebody/something I really admire your enthusiasm. You have to admire the way he handled the situation. admire somebody/something for something The school is widely admired for its excellent teaching. admire somebody for doing something I don't agree with her, but I admire her for sticking to her principles.
  2. 2  admire something to look at something and think that it is attractive and/or impressive He stood back to admire his handiwork. I've just been admiring your new car. Let’s just sit and admire the view.
  3. Word Origin late 16th cent.: from Latin admirari, from ad- ‘at’ + mirari ‘wonder’.Extra examples He is widely admired as a journalist. I couldn’t help but admire his determination. I rather admire him for his determination. She secretly admired and envied him. What do you most admire about her? You can only admire her courage and determination. You have to admire their dedication and commitment. I really admire her courage. I’ve just been admiring your new car. Let’s just sit and admire the view. You can’t help but admire their dedication and commitment.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: admire