Definition of advise verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    advise

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ədˈvaɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈvaɪz//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they advise
    BrE BrE//ədˈvaɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈvaɪz//
     
    he / she / it advises
    BrE BrE//ədˈvaɪzɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈvaɪzɪz//
     
    past simple advised
    BrE BrE//ədˈvaɪzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈvaɪzd//
     
    past participle advised
    BrE BrE//ədˈvaɪzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈvaɪzd//
     
    -ing form advising
    BrE BrE//ədˈvaɪzɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ədˈvaɪzɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to tell somebody what you think they should do in a particular situation advise (somebody) against something/against doing something I would strongly advise against going out on your own. advise somebody Her mother was away and couldn't advise her. advise something I'd advise extreme caution. + speech ‘Get there early,’ she advised (them). advise somebody to do something Police are advising people to stay at home. I'd advise you not to tell him. advise that… They advise that a passport be carried with you at all times. (British English also) They advise that a passport should be carried with you at all times. it is advised that… It is strongly advised that you take out insurance. advise doing something I'd advise buying your tickets well in advance if you want to travel in August. see also ill-advised, well advised Synonymsrecommendadvise advocate urgeThese words all mean to tell somebody what you think they should do in a particular situation.recommend to tell somebody what you think they should do in a particular situation; to say what you think the price or level of something should be:We’d recommend you to book your flight early. a recommended price of $50 advise to tell somebody what you think they should do in a particular situation:I’d advise you not to tell him.recommend or advise?Advise is a stronger word than recommend and is often used when the person giving the advice is in a position of authority:Police are advising fans without tickets to stay away. Police are recommending fans without tickets to stay away. I advise you… can suggest that you know better than the person you are advising: this may cause offence if they are your equal or senior to you. I recommend… mainly suggests that you are trying to be helpful and is less likely to cause offence. Recommend is often used with more positive advice to tell somebody about possible benefits and advise with more negative advice to warn somebody about possible dangers:He advised reading the book before seeing the movie. I would recommend against going out on your own.advocate (formal) to support or recommend something publicly:The group does not advocate the use of violence.urge (formal) to recommend something strongly:The situation is dangerous and the UN is urging caution.Patterns to recommend/​advise/​advocate/​urge that… It is recommended/​advised/​advocated/​urged that… to recommend/​advise/​urge somebody to do something to recommend/​advise/​advocate doing something to strongly recommend/​advise/​advocate somebody/​something
  2. 2  [intransitive, transitive] to give somebody help and information on a subject that you know a lot about advise (somebody) on/about something/about doing something We employ an expert to advise on new technology. She advises the government on environmental issues. advise (somebody) what, which, whether, etc… The pharmacist will advise which medicines are safe to take. Your lawyer can advise you whether to take any action.
  3. 3[transitive] (formal) to officially tell somebody something synonym inform advise somebody of something Please advise us of any change of address. advise somebody when, where, how, etc… I will contact you later to advise you when to come. advise somebody that… I regret to advise you that the course is now full.
  4. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French aviser, based on Latin ad- ‘to’ + visere, frequentative of videre ‘to see’. The original senses included ‘look at’ and ‘consider’, hence ‘consult with others’.Extra examples I strongly advise you not to do this. John would be ill advised to rely on their support. Please keep me advised of new developments in this case. They advised me against sending cash by post. They advised me against visiting the troubled south of the country. We can advise parents about education. We were badly advised by our lawyer. We will be happy to advise on any financial matters. We would always advise caution in the use of this drug. You would be better advised to consult an accountant. Her mother was away and couldn’t advise her. I’d advise buying your tickets well in advance if you want to travel in August. I’d advise extreme caution. I’d advise you not to tell him. It is strongly advised that you take out some form of medical insurance. Please advise us of any changes in your personal details. Police are advising fans without tickets to stay away.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: advise