Definition of anchor verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    anchor

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈæŋkə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈæŋkər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they anchor
    BrE BrE//ˈæŋkə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈæŋkər//
     
    he / she / it anchors
    BrE BrE//ˈæŋkəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈæŋkərz//
     
    past simple anchored
    BrE BrE//ˈæŋkəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈæŋkərd//
     
    past participle anchored
    BrE BrE//ˈæŋkəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈæŋkərd//
     
    -ing form anchoring
    BrE BrE//ˈæŋkərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈæŋkərɪŋ//
     
    Journalism, Travelling by boat or ship
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] anchor (something) to let an anchor down from a boat or ship in order to prevent it from moving away We anchored off the coast of Spain. See related entries: Travelling by boat or ship
  2. 2[transitive] anchor something to fix something firmly in position so that it cannot move Make sure the table is securely anchored. The crane is securely anchored at two points. The ropes were anchored to the rocks.
  3. 3[transitive, usually passive] anchor somebody/something (in/to something) to firmly base something on something else Her novels are anchored in everyday experience.
  4. 4[intransitive, transitive] anchor (something) (especially North American English) to be the person who introduces reports or reads the news on television or radio She anchored the evening news for seven years. See related entries: Journalism
  5. Word Origin Old English ancor, ancra, via Latin from Greek ankura; reinforced in Middle English by Old French ancre. The current form is from anchora, an erroneous Latin spelling. The verb (from Old French ancrer) dates from Middle English.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: anchor