Definition of anticipate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    anticipate

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they anticipate
    BrE BrE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪt//
     
    he / she / it anticipates
    BrE BrE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪts//
     
    past simple anticipated
    BrE BrE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪtɪd//
     
    past participle anticipated
    BrE BrE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form anticipating
    BrE BrE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ænˈtɪsɪpeɪtɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  to expect something anticipate something We don't anticipate any major problems. Our anticipated arrival time is 8.30. The eagerly anticipated movie will be released next month. anticipate doing something They anticipate moving to bigger premises by the end of the year. anticipate something doing something I don't anticipate it being a problem. anticipate that… We anticipate that sales will rise next year. it is anticipated that… It is anticipated that inflation will stabilize at 3%. compare unanticipated
  2. 2  to see what might happen in the future and take action to prepare for it anticipate something We need someone who can anticipate and respond to changes in the fashion industry. anticipate what, how, that, etc… Try and anticipate what the interviewers will ask.
  3. 3anticipate (doing) something | anticipate (something doing) something to think with pleasure and excitement about something that is going to happen We eagerly anticipated the day we would leave school. The more I anticipated arriving somewhere, the more disappointed I was.
  4. 4anticipate somebody (doing something) (formal) to do something before it can be done by somebody else synonym forestall When Scott reached the South Pole he found that Amundsen had anticipated him.
  5. Word Origin mid 16th cent. (in the senses ‘to take something into consideration’, ‘mention something before the proper time’): from Latin anticipat- ‘acted in advance’, from anticipare, based on ante- ‘before’ + capere ‘take’.Extra examples one of the most eagerly anticipated arts events of the year I don’t anticipate it being a problem. The band today announced details of their widely anticipated third album. The dog sat up, anticipating a biscuit. Try and anticipate what the interviewer will ask. We don’t anticipate any major problems.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: anticipate