English

Definition of appeal verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    appeal

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//əˈpiːl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpiːl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they appeal
    BrE BrE//əˈpiːl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpiːl//
     
    he / she / it appeals
    BrE BrE//əˈpiːlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpiːlz//
     
    past simple appealed
    BrE BrE//əˈpiːld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpiːld//
     
    past participle appealed
    BrE BrE//əˈpiːld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpiːld//
     
    -ing form appealing
    BrE BrE//əˈpiːlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈpiːlɪŋ//
     
    Helping others
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive] appeal (to somebody/something) (against something) to make a formal request to a court or to somebody in authority for a judgment or a decision to be changed He said he would appeal after being found guilty on four counts of murder. The company is appealing against the ruling. In North American English, the form appeal (something) (to somebody/something) is usually used, without a prepositionThe company has ten days to appeal the decision to the tribunal.
  2. 2  [intransitive] to attract or interest somebody The prospect of a long wait in the rain did not appeal. appeal to somebody The design has to appeal to all ages and social groups.
  3. 3  [intransitive] to make a serious and urgent request I am appealing (= asking for money) on behalf of the famine victims. appeal (to somebody) (for something) Community leaders appealed for calm (= urged people to remain calm). Police have appealed for witnesses to come forward. appeal to somebody to do something Organizers appealed to the crowd not to panic. See related entries: Helping others
  4. 4[intransitive] appeal (to something) to try to persuade somebody to do something by suggesting that it is a fair, reasonable or honest thing to do They needed to appeal to his sense of justice.
  5. Word Origin Middle English (in legal contexts): from Old French apel (noun), apeler (verb), from Latin appellare ‘to address’, based on ad- ‘to’ + pellere ‘to drive’.Extra examples Computer games used to appeal primarily to boys. He has decided to appeal to the European Court. He went over the heads of union officials, appealing directly to the workforce. Police appealed to the public for information about the crime. She appealed unsuccessfully against her conviction for murder. The idea of retiring early really appeals to me. The prospect of teaching such bright children appealed enormously. These characters will appeal directly to children’s imaginations. I am appealing on behalf of the famine victims. It’s a book that appeals to people of all ages. Nationalist leaders have appealed for calm. Police are appealing for witnesses to come forward. The idea appealed enormously.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: appeal