English

Definition of arrange verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    arrange

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//əˈreɪndʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈreɪndʒ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they arrange
    BrE BrE//əˈreɪndʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈreɪndʒ//
     
    he / she / it arranges
    BrE BrE//əˈreɪndʒɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈreɪndʒɪz//
     
    past simple arranged
    BrE BrE//əˈreɪndʒd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈreɪndʒd//
     
    past participle arranged
    BrE BrE//əˈreɪndʒd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈreɪndʒd//
     
    -ing form arranging
    BrE BrE//əˈreɪndʒɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈreɪndʒɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] to plan or organize something in advance arrange something The party was arranged quickly. She arranged a loan with the bank. Can I arrange an appointment for Monday? We met at six, as arranged. arrange how, where, etc… We've still got to arrange how to get to the airport. arrange to do something Have you arranged to meet him? arrange that… I've arranged that we can borrow their car. arrange for something (to do something) We arranged for a car to collect us from the airport. arrange with somebody (about something) I've arranged with the neighbours about feeding the cat while we are away. More Like This Verbs usually followed by infinitives afford, agree, appear, arrange, attempt, beg, choose, consent, decide, expect, fail, happen, hesitate, hope, intend, learn, manage, mean, neglect, offer, prepare, pretend, promise, refuse, swear, try, want, wishSee worksheet.
  2. 2  [transitive] arrange something to put something in a particular order; to make something neat or attractive The books are arranged alphabetically by author. I must arrange my financial affairs and make a will. She arranged the flowers in a vase.
  3. 3[transitive] arrange something (for something) to write or change a piece of music so that it is suitable for a particular instrument or voice He arranged traditional folk songs for the piano.
  4. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French arangier, from a- (from Latin ad ‘to, at’) + rangier ‘put in order’, from rang ‘rank’.Extra examples Can you arrange for this work to be carried out? Her red hair was carefully arranged and her face made up. I’d be very grateful if you could arrange for this work to be carried out. She arranged the chairs in neat rows. She took the list of visitors’ names and arranged them into groups of four. The clothes were arranged according to size. The names are arranged in alphabetical order. These matters are easy to arrange. These things can be arranged with difficulty. Todd will be able to arrange matters. A news conference was hastily arranged. Accommodation can be arranged in advance. I’ll arrange for a car to meet you at the airport. She arranged that we could stay at her brother’s house. We met at six, as arranged. We’ll need to arrange a bank loan. We’ve still got to arrange how we’re going to get there. You can arrange a convenient time with your tutor.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: arrange