Definition of assume verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    assume

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//əˈsjuːm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈsuːm//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they assume
    BrE BrE//əˈsjuːm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈsuːm//
     
    he / she / it assumes
    BrE BrE//əˈsjuːmz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈsuːmz//
     
    past simple assumed
    BrE BrE//əˈsjuːmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈsuːmd//
     
    past participle assumed
    BrE BrE//əˈsjuːmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈsuːmd//
     
    -ing form assuming
    BrE BrE//əˈsjuːmɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈsuːmɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  to think or accept that something is true but without having proof of it assume (that)… It is reasonable to assume (that) the economy will continue to improve. Let us assume for a moment that the plan succeeds. She would, he assumed, be home at the usual time. it is assumed (that)… It is generally assumed that stress is caused by too much work. assume something Don't always assume the worst (= that something bad has happened). In this example we have assumed a unit price of $10. assume somebody/something to be/have something I had assumed him to be a Belgian.
  2. 2assume something (formal) to take or begin to have power or responsibility synonym take on Rebel forces have assumed control of the capital. The court assumed responsibility for the girl's welfare.
  3. 3assume something (formal) to begin to have a particular quality or appearance synonym take somethingon This matter has assumed considerable importance. In the story the god assumes the form of an eagle.
  4. 4assume something (formal) to pretend to have a particular feeling or quality synonym put on He assumed an air of concern.
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin assumere, from ad- ‘towards’ + sumere ‘take’.Extra examples I think we can safely assume that this situation will continue. It is generally assumed that they were lovers. It is reasonable to assume that the economy will continue to improve. It’s all too easy to assume that people know what they are doing. Let us assume for a moment that the plan succeeds. People tend to assume the worst. A military junta assumed power in 1988. Don’t always assume the worst. Harris then assumed command of the battalion. He automatically assumed that I had children. He had assumed a stage Southern accent. His oldest brother assumed the role of father. I had assumed him to be French. I hope to go to college next year, always assuming that I pass my exams. It’s generally assumed that stress is caused by too much work. She assumed an air of concern. She would, she assumed, be home at the usual time. The court assumed responsibility for the girl’s welfare. We have assumed an average profit of £5 000 a month.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: assume