Definition of attitude noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    attitude

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈætɪtjuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈætɪtuːd//
     
    Describing unpleasant traits, Confident
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1  [countable] the way that you think and feel about somebody/something; the way that you behave towards somebody/something that shows how you think and feel attitude (to/towards/about/on somebody/something) changes in public attitudes to/about marriage social attitudes to/towards/about/on education the government’s attitude towards single parents to have a good/bad/positive/negative attitude towards somebody/something Youth is simply an attitude of mind. If you want to pass your exams you'd better change your attitude! You're taking a pretty selfish attitude over this, aren't you? A lot of drivers have a serious attitude problem (= they do not behave in a way that is acceptable to other people). Wordfinderaction, approach, attitude, behaviour, conform, eccentric, etiquette, habit, manners, morality
  2. 2[uncountable] confident, sometimes aggressive behaviour that shows you do not care about other people’s opinions and that you want to do things in an individual way a band with attitude You'd better get rid of that attitude and shape up, young man. See related entries: Describing unpleasant traits, Confident
  3. 3[countable] (formal) a position of the body Her hands were folded in an attitude of prayer.
  4. Word Origin late 17th cent. (denoting the placing or posture of a figure in art): from French, from Italian attitudine ‘fitness, posture’, from late Latin aptitudo, from aptus ‘fit’.Extra examples At school he was thought to have an attitude problem. Changing conditions require an attitude adjustment on the part of business. Don’t give me any attitude! He displayed a condescending attitude towards/​toward his co-workers. I try to have a healthy, positive attitude to life. Newspapers reflect social attitudes. She seems to have the right attitude for the job. She shares his somewhat cavalier attitude to the law. Sometimes it’s essential for doctors to cultivate a detached attitude. The experience changed his attitude to religion. The general attitude of the public is sympathetic. The government has taken a positive attitude to this problem. The policy reflects a caring attitude towards/​toward employees. The teachers seem to have a very relaxed attitude to discipline. There has been a marked change in attitude towards the European single currency. This sort of attitude exists among certain groups of people. Youth is simply an attitude of mind. a rock band with attitude an attitude of confidence and trust changing attitudes about death efforts to foster positive attitudes to learning Her attitude to her parents has always been somewhat negative. His general attitude of hostility did not impress the jury. I like her cheerfulness and her positive attitude. I tend to take the attitude that it’s best to leave well alone. If you want to pass your exams you’d better change your attitude. The political attitudes of young people are rarely taken seriously. There are some major differences between British and American attitudes when it comes to the role of government. They are accused of taking a cavalier attitude towards their employees’ safety. Try to develop the kind of attitude of mind that makes you tolerant of other people’s failings. We all need to show commitment and a can-do attitude. What is your attitude towards the job as a whole?Idioms
    strike a pose/an attitude
     
    jump to other results
    to hold your body in a particular way to create a particular impression to strike a dramatic pose
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: attitude