English

Definition of band noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    band

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//bænd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bænd//
     
    Hair products and accessories, Radio technology, Live music, Friends
     
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    group of musicians
  1. 1  [countable + singular or plural verb] a small group of musicians who play popular music together, often with a singer or singers a rock/jazz band She's a singer with a band. see also boy band, girl band See related entries: Live music
  2. 2  [countable + singular or plural verb] a group of musicians who play brass and percussion instruments a military band see also brass band, marching band, one-man band Wordfinderballet, ballroom, band, choreograph, dance, floor, folk dance, music, partner, step
  3. group of people
  4. 3  [countable + singular or plural verb] a group of people who do something together or who have the same ideas a band of outlaws He persuaded a small band of volunteers to help. See related entries: Friends
  5. strip of material/colour
  6. 4  [countable] a thin flat strip or circle of any material that is put around things, for example to hold them together or to make them stronger She always ties her hair back in a band. All babies in the hospital have name bands on their wrists. She wore a simple band of gold (= a ring) on her finger. see also armband, hairband, hatband, rubber band, sweatband, waistband See related entries: Hair products and accessories
  7. 5  [countable] a strip of colour or material on something that is different from what is around it a white plate with a blue band around the edge Wordfinderband, check, dot, fleck, pattern, speckle, splash, spot, streak, stripe
  8. of radio waves
  9. 6(also waveband) [countable] a range of radio waves Short-wave radio uses the 20–50–metre band. See related entries: Radio technology
  10. range
  11. 7[countable] a range of numbers, ages, prices, etc. within which people or things are counted or measured the 25–35 age band tax bands
  12. Word Originnoun senses 4 to 7 late Old English (in the sense of something that restrains), from Old Norse, reinforced in late Middle English by Old French bande, of Germanic origin; related to bind. noun senses 1 to 3 late Middle English: from Old French bande, of Germanic origin; related to banner.Extra examples He formed a garage band with his friends. He is one of a select band of top class players. He runs the business as a one-man band. He was accompanied onstage by his backing band. She plays in a rock band. She wore a simple band of gold on her finger. The light had expanded in a broad band across the sky. They hired a Beatles tribute band to play at the reception. We heard a band strike up in the park. Which tax band do you fall into? a band of rebels a drummer with a jazz band the 25–35 age band the excitement of seeing a live band He is one of a select band who have owned both Derby and Grand National winners. She persuaded a small band of volunteers to help. The bundle was held together with a rubber band. The plate was white with a blue band around the edge. The two men are part of a dwindling band of veterans. The young Irishman joined the elite band of Formula One drivers this week. They are members of a growing band of enthusiasts.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: band