English

Definition of bark verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    bark

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bɑːk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːrk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they bark
    BrE BrE//bɑːk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːrk//
     
    he / she / it barks
    BrE BrE//bɑːks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːrks//
     
    past simple barked
    BrE BrE//bɑːkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːrkt//
     
    past participle barked
    BrE BrE//bɑːkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːrkt//
     
    -ing form barking
    BrE BrE//ˈbɑːkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɑːrkɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] bark (at somebody/something) when a dog barks, it makes a short loud sound The dog suddenly started barking at us. The dog was barking furiously at a cat.
  2. 2[transitive] to give orders, ask questions, etc. in a loud, unfriendly way bark out something She barked out an order. bark something (at somebody) He barked questions at her. + speech ‘Who are you?’ he barked.
  3. 3[transitive] bark something (British English) to rub the skin off your knee, etc. by falling or by knocking against something synonym graze I barked my shins when I fell on the steps.
  4. Word Originverb senses 1 to 2 Old English beorc (noun), beorcan (verb), of Germanic origin; possibly related to break. verb sense 3 Middle English: from Old Norse bǫrkr; perhaps related to birch.Idioms
    be barking up the wrong tree
     
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    (informal) to have the wrong idea about how to get or achieve something You're barking up the wrong tree if you're expecting us to lend you any money.
    why keep a dog and bark yourself?
     
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    (informal, saying) if somebody can do a task for you, there is no point in doing it yourself
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bark