Definition of bat verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    bat

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bæt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bæt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they bat
    BrE BrE//bæt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bæt//
     
    he / she / it bats
    BrE BrE//bæts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bæts//
     
    past simple batted
    BrE BrE//ˈbætɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbætɪd//
     
    past participle batted
    BrE BrE//ˈbætɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbætɪd//
     
    -ing form batting
    BrE BrE//ˈbætɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbætɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1 [intransitive, transitive] bat (something) to hit a ball with a bat, especially in a game of baseball or cricket He bats very well. Who's batting first for the Orioles?
  2. 2[transitive] bat something + adv./prep. to hit something small that is flying through the air He batted the wasp away.
  3. Word Originverb late Old English batt ‘club, stick, staff’, perhaps partly from Old French batte, from battre ‘to strike’. bat your eyes/​eyelashes, not bat an eyelid. late 19th cent. (originally US): from dialect and US bat ‘to wink, blink’, variant of obsolete bate ‘to flutter’.Extra examples He went to bat, two runs down, with his team about to lose. Hick went in to bat after Hussain. India won the toss and put England in to bat. She really went to bat for me. Smith was first to bat for Warwickshire.Idioms
    bat your eyes/eyelashes
     
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    to open and close your eyes quickly, in a way that is supposed to be attractive
    (North American English, informal) to be very successful He’s made another sale? He’s really batting a thousand! (North American English, informal) to give somebody help and support
    not bat an eyelid(British English)(North American English not bat an eye)
     
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    (informal) to show no surprise or embarrassment when something unusual happens She didn't bat an eyelid when I told her my news.
    Phrasal Verbsbat somethingaround
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bat