Definition of bend verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    bend

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bend//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bend//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they bend
    BrE BrE//bend//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bend//
     
    he / she / it bends
    BrE BrE//bendz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bendz//
     
    past simple bent
    BrE BrE//bent//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bent//
     
    past participle bent
    BrE BrE//bent//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bent//
     
    -ing form bending
    BrE BrE//ˈbendɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbendɪŋ//
     
    Materials and properties
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] (especially of somebody’s body or head) to lean, or make something lean, in a particular direction He bent and kissed her. The doctor told me to avoid bending and stretching. + adv./prep. fields of poppies bending in the wind His dark head bent over her. She bent forward to pick up the newspaper. Slowly bend from the waist and bring your head down to your knees. bend something (+ adv./prep.) He bent his head and kissed her. She was bent over her desk writing a letter.
  2. 2  [transitive, intransitive] bend (something) if you bend your arm, leg, etc. or if it bends, you move it so that it is no longer straight Bend your knees, keeping your back straight. Lie flat and let your knees bend.
  3. 3  [transitive] bend something to force something that was straight into an angle or a curve Mark the pipe where you want to bend it. The knives were bent out of shape. He bent the wire into the shape of a square. See related entries: Materials and properties
  4. 4  [intransitive, transitive] to change direction to form a curve or an angle; to make something change direction in this way The road bent sharply to the right. bend something Glass and water both bend light.
  5. Word Origin Old English bendan ‘put in bonds, tension a bow by means of a string’, of Germanic origin; related to band ‘strip of material’.Extra examples Avoid bending at the waist when lifting heavy objects. He came closer and bent towards her. I bent down and tied my shoelace. I had to bend double to get under the table. Sarah bent close to him.Idioms
    bend somebody’s ear (about something)
     
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    (informal) to talk to somebody a lot about something, especially about a problem that you have
    bend your mind/efforts to something
     
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    (formal) to think very hard about or put a lot of effort into one particular thing
    bend/lean over backwards (to do something)
     
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    to make a great effort, especially in order to be helpful or fair I've bent over backwards to help him.
    to change the rules to suit a particular person or situation to say something that is not completely true I wasn’t exactly lying when I said I hadn’t seen her—I was just bending the truth a little. if you ask for something on bended knee(s), you ask for it in a very anxious and/or humble way I’d go down on bended knee if I thought she’d change her mind.
    Phrasal Verbsbend somebody to something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bend