English

Definition of bequeath verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    bequeath

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bɪˈkwiːð//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɪˈkwiːð//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they bequeath
    BrE BrE//bɪˈkwiːð//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɪˈkwiːð//
     
    he / she / it bequeaths
    BrE BrE//bɪˈkwiːðz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɪˈkwiːðz//
     
    past simple bequeathed
    BrE BrE//bɪˈkwiːðd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɪˈkwiːðd//
     
    past participle bequeathed
    BrE BrE//bɪˈkwiːðd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɪˈkwiːðd//
     
    -ing form bequeathing
    BrE BrE//bɪˈkwiːðɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɪˈkwiːðɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1to say in a will that you want somebody to have your property, money, etc. after you die synonym leave bequeath something (to somebody) He bequeathed his entire estate (= all his money and property) to his daughter. bequeath somebody something He bequeathed his daughter his entire estate.
  2. 2bequeath something (to somebody) | bequeath somebody something to leave the results of your work, knowledge, etc. for other people to use or deal with, especially after you have died The previous government had bequeathed a legacy of problems.
  3. Word Origin Old English becwethan, from be- ‘about’ (expressing transitivity) + cwethan ‘say’, of Germanic origin.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bequeath