Definition of blast verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    blast

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//blɑːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//blæst//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they blast
    BrE BrE//blɑːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//blæst//
     
    he / she / it blasts
    BrE BrE//blɑːsts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//blæsts//
     
    past simple blasted
    BrE BrE//ˈblɑːstɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈblæstɪd//
     
    past participle blasted
    BrE BrE//ˈblɑːstɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈblæstɪd//
     
    -ing form blasting
    BrE BrE//ˈblɑːstɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈblæstɪŋ//
     
     
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    explode
  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] blast (something) (+ adv./prep.) to violently destroy or break something into pieces, using explosives They blasted a huge crater in the runway. They had to blast a tunnel through the mountain. All the windows were blasted inwards with the force of the explosion. The jumbo jet was blasted out of the sky. Danger! Blasting in Progress!
  2. make loud noise
  3. 2[intransitive, transitive] to make a loud unpleasant noise, especially music blast (out) Music suddenly blasted out from the speakers. blast something (out) The radio blasted out rock music at full volume.
  4. criticize
  5. 3[transitive] blast somebody/something (for something/for doing something) (informal) to criticize somebody/something severely The movie was blasted by all the critics.
  6. hit/kick/shoot
  7. 4[transitive] blast somebody/something (+ adv./prep.) (informal) to hit, kick or shoot somebody/something with a lot of force He blasted the ball past the goalie. He blasted (= shot) the policeman right between the eyes.
  8. air/water
  9. 5[transitive] blast somebody/something (+ adv./prep.) to direct air, water, etc. at somebody/something with a lot of force Police blasted the demonstrators with water cannons.
  10. destroy with disease, etc.
  11. 6[transitive, usually passive] blast something to destroy something such as a plant with disease, cold, heat, etc. Their whole crop had been blasted by a late frost.
  12. Word Origin Old English blǣst, of Germanic origin; related to blaze ‘present news in a sensational manner’. Phrasal Verbsblast awayblast off
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: blast