English

Definition of bolt verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    bolt

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bəʊlt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//boʊlt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they bolt
    BrE BrE//bəʊlt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//boʊlt//
     
    he / she / it bolts
    BrE BrE//bəʊlts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//boʊlts//
     
    past simple bolted
    BrE BrE//ˈbəʊltɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈboʊltɪd//
     
    past participle bolted
    BrE BrE//ˈbəʊltɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈboʊltɪd//
     
    -ing form bolting
    BrE BrE//ˈbəʊltɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈboʊltɪŋ//
     
    Manufacturing, How machines work
     
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  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] bolt (something) to fasten something such as a door or window by sliding a bolt across; to be able to be fastened in this way Don't forget to bolt the door. The gate bolts on the inside.
  2. 2[transitive] to fasten things together with a bolt bolt A to B The vice is bolted to the workbench. bolt A and B together The various parts of the car are then bolted together. See related entries: Manufacturing, How machines work
  3. 3[intransitive] if an animal, especially a horse, bolts, it suddenly runs away because it is frightened
  4. 4[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) (of a person) to run away, especially in order to escape When he saw the police arrive, he bolted down an alley.
  5. 5[transitive] bolt something (down) to eat something very quickly Don't bolt your food!
  6. 6(North American English) [transitive, intransitive] bolt (something) to stop supporting a particular group or political party Many Democrats bolted the party to vote Republican.
  7. 7[intransitive] (of a plant, especially a vegetable) to grow too quickly and start producing seeds and so become less good to eat
  8. Word Originverb senses 1 to 2 Old English, ‘arrow’, of unknown origin; related to Dutch bout and German Bolzen ‘arrow, bolt for a door’. verb senses 3 to 7 Middle English: from the other verb senses of bolt, expressing the sense ‘fly like an arrow’.Extra examples Make sure that the rails are securely bolted in place. The two parts are bolted together. The yacht’s keel is bolted to the hull. Bonnie the mare broke free and bolted. Don’t forget to bolt the door. For a moment I thought about bolting, but there was no escape. She bolted through the open door. The plane swooped down low and the horses bolted. They turned and bolted off down the stairs.Idioms
    close, lock, etc. the stable door after the horse has bolted (British English) (US English close, etc. the barn door after the horse has escaped)
     
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    to try to prevent or avoid loss or damage when it is already too late to do so
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bolt