Definition of bombard verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    bombard

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bɒmˈbɑːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːmˈbɑːrd//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they bombard
    BrE BrE//bɒmˈbɑːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːmˈbɑːrd//
     
    he / she / it bombards
    BrE BrE//bɒmˈbɑːdz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːmˈbɑːrdz//
     
    past simple bombarded
    BrE BrE//bɒmˈbɑːdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːmˈbɑːrdɪd//
     
    past participle bombarded
    BrE BrE//bɒmˈbɑːdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːmˈbɑːrdɪd//
     
    -ing form bombarding
    BrE BrE//bɒmˈbɑːdɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɑːmˈbɑːrdɪŋ//
     
    Conflict
     
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  1. 1bombard somebody/something (with something) to attack a place by firing large guns at it or dropping bombs on it continuously Madrid was heavily bombarded for several months. See related entries: Conflict
  2. 2bombard somebody/something (with something) to attack somebody with a lot of questions, criticisms, etc. or by giving them too much information We have been bombarded with letters of complaint. We are bombarded daily with propaganda about what we should eat.
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (as a noun denoting an early form of cannon, also a shawm) from Old French bombarde, probably based on Latin bombus ‘booming, humming’, from Greek bombos, of imitative origin. The verb (late 16th cent.) is from French bombarder.Extra examples We’re all constantly bombarded with television ads. The interviewer bombarded her with intimate questions. The local newspaper has been bombarded with letters from angry residents. The media bombard us continually with images of how we should look.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bombard