English

Definition of bother noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    bother

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈbɒðə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɑːðər//
     
     
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  1. 1[uncountable] trouble or difficulty You seem to have got yourself into a spot of bother. I don't want to put you to any bother (= cause you any trouble). Don't go to the bother of tidying up on my account (= don't make the effort to do it). ‘Thanks for your help!’ ‘It was no bother.’ Call them and save yourself the bother of going round. I don’t mind looking after the children; they aren’t any bother. She’s been having a bit of bother with her car.
  2. 2a bother [singular] an annoying situation, thing or person synonym nuisance I hope I haven't been a bother.
  3. Word Origin late 17th cent. (as a noun in the dialect sense ‘noise, chatter’): of Anglo-Irish origin; probably related to Irish bodhaire ‘noise’, bodhraim ‘deafen, annoy’. The verb (originally dialect) meant ‘confuse with noise’ in the early 18th cent.Extra examples He’s got a spot of bother with his eyes. He’s having a little bother with his computer. He’s in a bit of bother with the police. I don’t mind looking after your dog—it’s no bother to me. I had a little bother finding your house. I wouldn’t go to the bother of making the cakes myself. I’d love to come and stay with you, but I don’t want to put you to any bother. It was no bother having the children to stay. The children were no bother. We found the hotel without any bother. Your little boy didn’t give me any bother. Don’t go to the bother of tidying up on my account. I don’t mind looking after the children; they aren’t any bother. I don’t want to put you to any bother. She’s having a bit of bother with her car. You seem to have got yourself into a spot of bother.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bother