Definition of bound verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    bound

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//baʊnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//baʊnd//
     
    see also bindVerb Forms present simple I / you / we / they bound
    BrE BrE//baʊnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//baʊnd//
     
    he / she / it bounds
    BrE BrE//baʊndz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//baʊndz//
     
    past simple bounded
    BrE BrE//ˈbaʊndɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbaʊndɪd//
     
    ; BrE BrE//ˈbaʊndɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbaʊndɪd//
     
    past participle bounded
    BrE BrE//ˈbaʊndɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbaʊndɪd//
     
    ; BrE BrE//ˈbaʊndɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbaʊndɪd//
     
    -ing form bounding
    BrE BrE//ˈbaʊndɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbaʊndɪŋ//
     
    ; BrE BrE//ˈbaʊndɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbaʊndɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] + adv./prep. to run with long steps, especially in an enthusiastic way The dogs bounded ahead.
  2. 2[transitive, usually passive] bound something (formal) to form the edge or limit of an area The field was bounded on the left by a wood.
  3. Word Originverb sense 1 early 16th cent. (as a noun): from French bond (noun), bondir (verb) ‘resound’, later ‘rebound’, from late Latin bombitare, from Latin bombus ‘humming’. verb sense 2 Middle English (in the senses ‘landmark’ and ‘borderland’): from Old French bodne, from medieval Latin bodina, earlier butina, of unknown ultimate origin.Extra examples He bounded back to meet us. Louis came bounding down the stairs. The dog bounded up to him. A man bounded up to her and shook her hand. He braked sharply as a deer bounded across the road.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bound