English

Definition of buck verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    buck

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bʌk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they buck
    BrE BrE//bʌk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌk//
     
    he / she / it bucks
    BrE BrE//bʌks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌks//
     
    past simple bucked
    BrE BrE//bʌkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌkt//
     
    past participle bucked
    BrE BrE//bʌkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌkt//
     
    -ing form bucking
    BrE BrE//ˈbʌkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʌkɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] (of a horse) to jump with the two back feet or all four feet off the ground
  2. 2[intransitive] to move up and down suddenly or in a way that is not controlled The boat bucked and heaved beneath them. The shotgun bucked in his hands.
  3. 3[transitive] buck something (informal) to resist or oppose something One or two companies have managed to buck the trend of the recession. He admired her willingness to buck the system (= oppose authority or rules). The President is unlikely to buck pressure from the public.
  4. Word Originverb Old English, partly from buc ‘male deer’ (of Germanic origin, related to Dutch bok and German Bock); reinforced by bucca ‘male goat’, of the same ultimate origin.Idioms (British English, informal) to start behaving in a more acceptable way, so that work gets done better, etc. Phrasal Verbsbuck upbuck somebody up
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: buck