English

Definition of budget verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

budget

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈbʌdʒɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʌdʒɪt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they budget
BrE BrE//ˈbʌdʒɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʌdʒɪt//
 
he / she / it budgets
BrE BrE//ˈbʌdʒɪts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʌdʒɪts//
 
past simple budgeted
BrE BrE//ˈbʌdʒɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʌdʒɪtɪd//
 
past participle budgeted
BrE BrE//ˈbʌdʒɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʌdʒɪtɪd//
 
-ing form budgeting
BrE BrE//ˈbʌdʒɪtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʌdʒɪtɪŋ//
 
Economy
 
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[intransitive, transitive] to be careful about the amount of money you spend; to plan to spend an amount of money for a particular purpose If we budget carefully we'll be able to afford the trip. budget for something I've budgeted for two new members of staff. budget something (for something) Ten million francs has been budgeted for the project. budget something (at something) The project has been budgeted at ten million francs. Synonymssavebudget economize tighten your beltThese words all mean to spend less money.save to keep money instead of spending it, often in order to buy a particular thing:I’m saving for a new car.budget to be careful about the amount of money you spend; to plan to spend an amount of money for a particular purpose:If we budget carefully we’ll be able to afford the trip.economize to use less money, time, etc. than you normally usetighten your belt (rather informal) to spend less money because there is less available:With the price increases, we are all having to tighten our belts.Patterns to save up/​budget for something to have to save/​budget/​economize/​tighten our belts to try to/​manage to save/​budget/​economize See related entries: Economy Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French bougette, diminutive of bouge ‘leather bag’, from Latin bulga ‘leather bag, knapsack’, of Gaulish origin. Compare with bulge. The word originally meant a pouch or wallet, and later its contents. In the mid 18th cent., the Chancellor of the Exchequer, in presenting his annual statement, was said “to open the budget”. In the late 19th cent. the use of the term was extended from governmental to other finances.Extra examples If we budget carefully we should be able to afford a holiday this year. We have budgeted $10 000 for advertising. the amount budgeted for training If we budget carefully we’ll be able to afford the trip. Ten million euros has been budgeted for the project.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: budget