Definition of bump verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    bump

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bʌmp//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌmp//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they bump
    BrE BrE//bʌmp//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌmp//
     
    he / she / it bumps
    BrE BrE//bʌmps//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌmps//
     
    past simple bumped
    BrE BrE//bʌmpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌmpt//
     
    past participle bumped
    BrE BrE//bʌmpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʌmpt//
     
    -ing form bumping
    BrE BrE//ˈbʌmpɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʌmpɪŋ//
     
    Injuries, Plane travel
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] to hit somebody/something by accident bump into somebody/something In the dark I bumped into a chair. bump against somebody/something The car bumped against the kerb. Synonymshitknock bang strike bump bashThese words all mean to come against something with a lot of force.hit to come against something with force, especially causing damage or injury:The boy was hit by a speeding car.knock to hit something so that it moves or breaks; to put somebody/​something into a particular state or position by hitting them/​it:Someone had knocked a hole in the wall.bang to hit something in a way that makes a loud noise:The baby was banging the table with his spoon.strike (formal) to hit somebody/​something hard:The ship struck a rock.bump to hit somebody/​something accidentally:In the darkness I bumped into a chair.bash (informal) to hit against something very hard:I braked too late, bashing into the car in front.Patterns to hit/​knock/​bang/​bump/​bash against somebody/​something to knock/​bang/​bump/​bash into somebody/​something to hit/​strike the ground/​floor/​wall
  2. 2[transitive] bump something (against/on something) to hit something, especially a part of your body, against or on something Be careful not to bump your head on the beam when you stand up. See related entries: Injuries
  3. 3[intransitive, transitive] to move across a rough surface + adv./prep. The jeep bumped along the dirt track. bump something + adv./prep. The car bumped its way slowly down the drive. She entered the subway, bumping her bags down the steps.
  4. 4[transitive] bump somebody + adv./prep. to move somebody from one group or position to another; to remove somebody from a group The airline apologized and bumped us up to first class. If you are bumped off an airline because of overbooking, you are entitled to compensation. The coach told him he had been bumped from the crew. See related entries: Plane travel
  5. Word Origin mid 16th cent. (as a verb): imitative, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.Extra examples I bumped into the corner of a table as I left. I bumped my head on the door frame. I ran after her, bumping against people in my rush. In the darkness I bumped into a chair. She bumped her knee as she was climbing into the pool. She entered the subway, bumping her bags down the step. Their boat came up alongside, bumping the side of ours. Toddlers are always falling over and bumping their heads. Phrasal Verbsbump into somebodybump somebodyoffbump somethingupbump up against something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bump