Definition of cajole verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

cajole

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//kəˈdʒəʊl//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kəˈdʒoʊl//
 
[transitive, intransitive]Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they cajole
BrE BrE//kəˈdʒəʊl//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kəˈdʒoʊl//
 
he / she / it cajoles
BrE BrE//kəˈdʒəʊlz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kəˈdʒoʊlz//
 
past simple cajoled
BrE BrE//kəˈdʒəʊld//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kəˈdʒoʊld//
 
past participle cajoled
BrE BrE//kəˈdʒəʊld//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kəˈdʒoʊld//
 
-ing form cajoling
BrE BrE//kəˈdʒəʊlɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kəˈdʒoʊlɪŋ//
 
 
jump to other results
to make somebody do something by talking to them and being very nice to them synonym coax cajole somebody (into something/into doing something) He cajoled me into agreeing to do the work. cajole something out of somebody I managed to cajole his address out of them. (+ speech) ‘Please say yes,’ she cajoled. Her voice was soft and cajoling. Word Origin mid 17th cent.: from French cajoler.Extra examples He didn’t like the microphone and had to be cajoled into using it. He pleaded, cajoled, even offered bribes, but it was too late. He was coaxed/​cajoled out of retirement. I managed to cajole his address out of him. She cajoled them to say what they really thought. The client is then cajoled into further investment, often against their own real interests. We try to encourage, teach, cajole and provide incentives.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: cajole