English

Definition of check verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    check

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//tʃek//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃek//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they check
    BrE BrE//tʃek//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃek//
     
    he / she / it checks
    BrE BrE//tʃeks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃeks//
     
    past simple checked
    BrE BrE//tʃekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃekt//
     
    past participle checked
    BrE BrE//tʃekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃekt//
     
    -ing form checking
    BrE BrE//ˈtʃekɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtʃekɪŋ//
     
     
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    examine
  1. 1  [transitive] check something (for something) to examine something to see if it is correct, safe or acceptable Check the container for cracks or leaks. She gave me the minutes of the meeting to read and check. Check the oil and water before setting off. Check your work before handing it in. Customs officers have the right to check all luggage going through customs. Synonymscheckexamine inspect go over somethingThese words all mean to look closely to make sure that everything is correct, in good condition, or acceptable.check to look at something closely to make sure that everything is correct, in good condition, safe or satisfactory:Check your work before handing it in.examine to look at somebody/​something closely to see if there is anything wrong or to find the cause of a problem:The goods were examined for damage on arrival.inspect to look at somebody/​something closely to make sure that everything is satisfactory; to officially visit a school, factory, etc. in order to check that rules are being obeyed and that standards are acceptable:Make sure you inspect the goods before signing for them. The Tourist Board inspects all recommended hotels at least once a year.check, examine or inspect?All these words can be used when you are looking for possible problems, but only check is used for mistakes:Examine/​Inspect your work before handing it in. Only examine is used when looking for the cause of a problem:The doctor checked/​inspected her but could find nothing wrong. Examine is used more often about a professional person:The surveyor examined the walls for signs of damp.Inspect is used more often about an official:Public health officials were called in to inspect the restaurant.go over something to check something carefully for mistakes, damage or anything dangerous:Go over your work for spelling mistakes before you hand it in.Patterns to check/​examine/​inspect/​go over (something) for something to check/​examine/​inspect/​go over something to see if/​whether… to check/​examine/​inspect/​go over something carefully/​thoroughly
  2. make sure
  3. 2  [intransitive, transitive] to find out if something/somebody is present, correct or true or if something is how you think it is ‘Is Mary in the office?’ ‘Just a moment. I'll go and check.’ check something Hang on—I just need to check my email. check (that)… Go and check (that) I’ve locked the windows. check (with somebody) (what/whether, etc…) You'd better check with Jane what time she's expecting us tonight. see also cross-check, double-check
  4. control
  5. 3[transitive] check something to control something; to stop something from increasing or getting worse The government is determined to check the growth of public spending. She tied some strips of cloth around the wound to check the bleeding.
  6. 4[transitive] to stop yourself from saying or doing something or from showing a particular emotion check something to check your anger/laughter/tears check yourself She wanted to tell him the whole truth but she checked herself—it wasn't the right moment.
  7. coats/bags/cases
  8. 5[transitive] check something (North American English) to leave coats, bags, etc. in an official place (called a checkroom) while you are visiting a club, restaurant, etc. Do you want to check your coats?
  9. 6[transitive] check something (North American English) to leave bags or cases with an official so that they can be put on a plane or train How many bags are you checking?
  10. make mark
  11. 7[transitive] check something (North American English) (British English tick) to put a mark (✓) next to an item on a list, an answer, etc. Check the box next to the right answer.
  12. Word Originverb Middle English (originally as used in the game of chess): the noun and exclamation from Old French eschec, from medieval Latin scaccus, via Arabic from Persian šāh ‘king’; the verb from Old French eschequier ‘play chess, put in check’. The sense ‘stop or control’ arose from the use in chess, and led (in the late 17th cent.) to ‘examine the accuracy of’.Extra examples Always check that the electricity is switched off before you start. Check the engine oil level regularly. Check the roof for loose slates. He was just checking to see if I was in my room. I checked with her to see if she needed any help. I’ll need to check these figures against last year’s. It’s worth checking that there is no rust on the car. She began mentally checking off the things on her to-do list. The cartons were all checked off as they were unloaded. To take advantage of this extra bonus offer, simply check the box on your order form. We had better check that all the doors are locked. ‘Is Mary in the office?’ ‘Just a moment. I’ll go and check.’ Check the oil and water in the car before setting off. Go and check that I’ve locked the windows. She made no effort to check her tears and just let them run down her face. She wanted to tell him the whole truth but she checked herself. The active ingredient checks the growth of bacteria. You’d better check with Jane what time she’s expecting us. Phrasal Verbscheck in (at…)check somethingincheck into…check off somebodycheck on somebodycheck outcheck out (of…)check out somebodycheck somethingoutcheck over somethingcheck up on somebodycheck up on something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: check