Definition of choke verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    choke

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//tʃəʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃoʊk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they choke
    BrE BrE//tʃəʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃoʊk//
     
    he / she / it chokes
    BrE BrE//tʃəʊks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃoʊks//
     
    past simple choked
    BrE BrE//tʃəʊkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃoʊkt//
     
    past participle choked
    BrE BrE//tʃəʊkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʃoʊkt//
     
    -ing form choking
    BrE BrE//ˈtʃəʊkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtʃoʊkɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to be unable to breathe because the passage to your lungs is blocked or you cannot get enough air; to make somebody unable to breathe She almost choked to death in the thick fumes. choke on something He was choking on a piece of toast. choke somebody Very small toys can choke a baby.
  2. 2[transitive] choke somebody to make somebody stop breathing by squeezing their throat synonym strangle He may have been choked or poisoned.
  3. 3[intransitive, transitive] to be unable to speak normally especially because of strong emotion; to make somebody feel too emotional to speak normally choke (with something) His voice was choking with rage. choke something Despair choked her words. ‘I can't bear it,’ he said in a choked voice. see also choked
  4. 4[transitive] to block or fill a passage, space, etc. so that movement is difficult choke something (with something) The pond was choked with rotten leaves. choke something up (with something) The roads are choked up with traffic.
  5. 5[intransitive] (North American English, informal) to fail at something, for example because you are nervous
  6. Word Origin Middle English: from Old English ācēocian (verb), from cēoce ‘cheek, jaw’, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch kaak.Extra examples My son nearly choked on one of those nuts. The fumes from the burning tyres made her choke. The panic rising in his throat threatened to choke him. In summer the roads around the town are choked up with traffic. She had been choked to death when her necklace snagged on overhanging branches. The device contains small parts which could easily choke a child. The water flooded his mouth, choking him. Thick clouds of dust choked him. Phrasal Verbschoke somethingbackchoke somethingdownchoke somethingoffchoke outchoke up
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: choke