English

Definition of coast verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    coast

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kəʊst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//koʊst//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they coast
    BrE BrE//kəʊst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//koʊst//
     
    he / she / it coasts
    BrE BrE//kəʊsts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//koʊsts//
     
    past simple coasted
    BrE BrE//ˈkəʊstɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkoʊstɪd//
     
    past participle coasted
    BrE BrE//ˈkəʊstɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkoʊstɪd//
     
    -ing form coasting
    BrE BrE//ˈkəʊstɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkoʊstɪŋ//
     
    Driving
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) (of a car or a bicycle) to move, especially down a hill, without using any power The car coasted along until it stopped. She took her feet off the pedals and coasted downhill. See related entries: Driving
  2. 2[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) (of a vehicle) to move quickly and smoothly, without using much power The plane coasted down the runway. We coasted along the country lanes.
  3. 3[intransitive] coast (through/to something) to be successful at something without having to try hard He coasted through his final exams. Our horse coasted home(= won easily) by three lengths.
  4. 4[intransitive] coast (along) (disapproving) to put very little effort into something You're just coasting—it's time to work hard now.
  5. 5[intransitive] (of a ship) to stay close to land while sailing around the coast
  6. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘side of the body’), from Old French coste (noun), costeier (verb), from Latin costa ‘rib, flank, side’. The current noun sense arose from the phrase coast of the sea ‘side of the sea’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: coast