Definition of coax verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

coax

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//kəʊks//
 
; NAmE NAmE//koʊks//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they coax
BrE BrE//kəʊks//
 
; NAmE NAmE//koʊks//
 
he / she / it coaxes
BrE BrE//ˈkəʊksɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkoʊksɪz//
 
past simple coaxed
BrE BrE//kəʊkst//
 
; NAmE NAmE//koʊkst//
 
past participle coaxed
BrE BrE//kəʊkst//
 
; NAmE NAmE//koʊkst//
 
-ing form coaxing
BrE BrE//ˈkəʊksɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkoʊksɪŋ//
 
 
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to persuade somebody to do something by talking to them in a kind and gentle way synonym cajole coax somebody/something (into doing something) She coaxed the horse into coming a little closer. coax somebody/something (into/out of something) He was coaxed out of retirement to help the failing company. coax somebody/something (+ adv./prep.) She had to coax the car along. Police managed to coax the man down from the ledge. coax (somebody/something) + speech ‘Nearly there,’ she coaxed. Word Origin late 16th cent.: from obsolete cokes ‘simpleton’, of unknown origin. The original sense was ‘fondle’, hence ‘persuade by caresses or flattery’, the underlying sense being ‘make a simpleton of’.Extra examples He gently coaxed life back into my frozen toes. She never failed to coax good results out of her pupils. ‘Come on, just a little bit further,’ he coaxed. Police managed to coax him down from the ledge. She gently coaxes them to speak about their experiences. She had coaxed, cajoled and bribed the boys to do what she wanted. Phrasal Verbscoax something out from somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: coax

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