Definition of command verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    command

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɑːnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmænd//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they command
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɑːnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmænd//
     
    he / she / it commands
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɑːndz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmændz//
     
    past simple commanded
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɑːndɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmændɪd//
     
    past participle commanded
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɑːndɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmændɪd//
     
    -ing form commanding
    BrE BrE//ˈmɑːndɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈmændɪŋ//
     
    The navy
     
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  1. 1  [transitive] (of somebody in a position of authority) to tell somebody to do something synonym order command somebody to do something He commanded his men to retreat. command something She commanded the release of the prisoners. + speech ‘Come here!’ he commanded (them). command that… (formal) The commission intervened and commanded that work on the building cease. (British English also) The commission commanded that work on the building should cease.
  2. in army
  3. 2  [transitive, intransitive] command (somebody/something) to be in charge of a group of people in the army, navy, etc. The troops were commanded by General Haig. See related entries: The navy
  4. deserve and get
  5. 3[transitive, no passive] (not used in the progressive tenses) command something to deserve and get something because of the special qualities you have to command sympathy/support She was able to command the respect of the class. The headlines commanded her attention. As a top lawyer, he can expect to command a six-figure salary.
  6. view
  7. 4[transitive, no passive] (not used in the progressive tenses) command something (formal) to be in a position from where you can see or control something The hotel commands a fine view of the valley. They built a castle commanding the river crossing.
  8. control
  9. 5[transitive, no passive] (not used in the progressive tenses) command something (formal) to have control of something; to have something available for use The party was no longer able to command a majority in Parliament. the power and finances commanded by the police
  10. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French comander ‘to command’, from late Latin commandare, from com- (expressing intensive force) + mandare ‘commit, command’. Compare with commend.Extra examples ‘Get back to your room,’ he commanded. He was the officer commanding the troops in the Western region. The squadron was commanded by Major Frank Broad.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: command