Definition of commandeer verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

commandeer

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˌkɒmənˈdɪə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːmənˈdɪr//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they commandeer
BrE BrE//ˌkɒmənˈdɪə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːmənˈdɪr//
 
he / she / it commandeers
BrE BrE//ˌkɒmənˈdɪəz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːmənˈdɪrz//
 
past simple commandeered
BrE BrE//ˌkɒmənˈdɪəd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːmənˈdɪrd//
 
past participle commandeered
BrE BrE//ˌkɒmənˈdɪəd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːmənˈdɪrd//
 
-ing form commandeering
BrE BrE//ˌkɒmənˈdɪərɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːmənˈdɪrɪŋ//
 
 
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commandeer something to take control of a building, a vehicle, etc. for military purposes during a war, or by force for your own use synonym requisition A group of young men had commandeered a truck, and were driving around the town in it. The soldiers had commandeered the farm and the villa five months ago. Word Origin early 19th cent.: from Afrikaans kommandeer, from Dutch commanderen, from French commander ‘to command’, from late Latin commandare, from com- (expressing intensive force) + mandare ‘commit, command’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: commandeer