Definition of commit verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    commit

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they commit
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmɪt//
     
    he / she / it commits
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmɪts//
     
    past simple committed
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmɪtɪd//
     
    past participle committed
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form committing
    BrE BrE//kəˈmɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈmɪtɪŋ//
     
    Exams and assessment, Types of punishment, Committing crime
     
    jump to other results
    crime
  1. 1  [transitive] commit a crime, etc. to do something wrong or illegal to commit murder/adultery Most crimes are committed by young men. appalling crimes committed against innocent children See related entries: Committing crime
  2. suicide
  3. 2  [transitive] commit suicide to kill yourself deliberately
  4. promise/say definitely
  5. 3  [transitive, often passive] to promise sincerely that you will definitely do something, keep to an agreement or arrangement, etc. commit somebody/yourself (to something/to doing something) The President is committed to reforming health care. Borrowers should think carefully before committing themselves to taking out a loan. commit somebody/yourself to do something Both sides committed themselves to settle the dispute peacefully.
  6. 4[transitive] commit yourself (to something) to give an opinion or make a decision openly so that it is then difficult to change it You don't have to commit yourself now, just think about it. see also non-committal
  7. be loyal
  8. 5[intransitive] commit (to somebody/something) to be completely loyal to one person, organization, etc. or give all your time and effort to your work, an activity, etc. Why are so many men scared to commit? (= say they will be loyal to one person) see also committed
  9. money/time
  10. 6[transitive] commit something to spend money or time on something/somebody The council has committed large amounts of money to housing projects.
  11. to hospital/prison
  12. 7[transitive, often passive] commit somebody to something to order somebody to be sent to a hospital, prison, etc. She was committed to a psychiatric hospital. See related entries: Types of punishment
  13. somebody for trial
  14. 8[transitive] commit somebody to send somebody for trial in court
  15. something to memory
  16. 9[transitive] commit something to memory to learn something well enough to remember it exactly She committed the instructions to memory. See related entries: Exams and assessment
  17. something to paper/writing
  18. 10[transitive] commit something to paper/writing to write something down More Like This Consonant-doubling verbs bob, club, dub, grab, rub, sob, throb kid, nod, pad, plod, prod, shred, skid, thud beg, blog, bug, drag, drug, flag, hug, jog, log, mug, nag, plug bar, confer, infer, occur, prefer, refer, star, stir, transfer acquit, admit, allot, chat, clot, commit, jut, knit, pat, regret, rot, spot, submit (in British English:) appal, cancel, channel, control, counsel, enrol, equal, excel, fuel, fulfil, label, level, marvel, model, pedal, quarrel, signal, travelSee worksheet.
  19. Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin committere ‘join, entrust’ (in medieval Latin ‘put into custody’), from com- ‘with’ + mittere ‘put or send’.Extra examples He denied conspiring to commit robberies in April last year. He has now committed us to buying the house. He was punished for a murder he did not commit. Her father had committed suicide. I had committed a faux pas by referring to her ex-husband. The University committed substantial funds to assisting mature students. The attackers were committed for trial at Bristol Crown Court. Was she capable of committing a crime? We need people to commit themselves to regular voluntary work. committing an act of violence Both candidates refused to commit themselves to tax cuts. He had never committed himself to any ideology. I don’t know what his opinion is. He won’t commit himself. Several countries were reluctant to commit themselves to the treaty. The party was committed to reforming the electoral system. We heard of some of the appalling crimes committed against innocent children. What leads someone to commit murder? You don’t have to commit yourself now, just think about it.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: commit