Definition of confer verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    confer

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kənˈfɜː(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈfɜːr//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they confer
    BrE BrE//kənˈfɜː(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈfɜːr//
     
    he / she / it confers
    BrE BrE//kənˈfɜːz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈfɜːrz//
     
    past simple conferred
    BrE BrE//kənˈfɜːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈfɜːrd//
     
    past participle conferred
    BrE BrE//kənˈfɜːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈfɜːrd//
     
    -ing form conferring
    BrE BrE//kənˈfɜːrɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈfɜːrɪŋ//
     
    Exams and degrees
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] confer (with somebody) (on/about something) to discuss something with somebody, in order to exchange opinions or get advice He wanted to confer with his colleagues before reaching a decision.
  2. 2[transitive] confer something (on/upon somebody) to give somebody an award, a university degree or a particular honour or right An honorary degree was conferred on him by Oxford University in 2009. More Like This Consonant-doubling verbs bob, club, dub, grab, rub, sob, throb kid, nod, pad, plod, prod, shred, skid, thud beg, blog, bug, drag, drug, flag, hug, jog, log, mug, nag, plug bar, confer, infer, occur, prefer, refer, star, stir, transfer acquit, admit, allot, chat, clot, commit, jut, knit, pat, regret, rot, spot, submit (in British English:) appal, cancel, channel, control, counsel, enrol, equal, excel, fuel, fulfil, label, level, marvel, model, pedal, quarrel, signal, travelSee worksheet. See related entries: Exams and degrees
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (in the general sense ‘bring together’, also in sense (1)): from Latin conferre, from con- ‘together’ + ferre ‘bring’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: confer