Definition of conjure verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

conjure

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈkʌndʒə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌndʒər//
 
[intransitive, transitive]Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they conjure
BrE BrE//ˈkʌndʒə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌndʒər//
 
he / she / it conjures
BrE BrE//ˈkʌndʒəz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌndʒərz//
 
past simple conjured
BrE BrE//ˈkʌndʒəd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌndʒərd//
 
past participle conjured
BrE BrE//ˈkʌndʒəd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌndʒərd//
 
-ing form conjuring
BrE BrE//ˈkʌndʒərɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌndʒərɪŋ//
 
 
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  • to do clever tricks such as making things seem to appear or disappear as if by magic Her grandfather taught her to conjure. conjure something + adv./prep. He could conjure coins from behind people's ears.
  • Word Origin Middle English (also in the sense ‘oblige by oath’): from Old French conjurer ‘to plot or exorcize’, from Latin conjurare ‘band together by an oath, conspire’ (in medieval Latin ‘invoke’), from con- ‘together’ + jurare ‘swear’.Idioms
      a name to conjure with(British English)
       
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    1. 1(North American English a name to reckon with) a person or thing that is well known and respected in a particular field Miyazaki is still a name to conjure with among anime fans.
    2. 2(humorous) used when you mention a name that you think is difficult to remember or pronounce He comes from Tighnabruaich—now there's a name to conjure with!
    Phrasal Verbsconjure something from somethingconjure somethingup
    See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: conjure