Definition of conquer verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    conquer

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒŋkə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːŋkər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they conquer
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒŋkə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːŋkər//
     
    he / she / it conquers
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒŋkəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːŋkərz//
     
    past simple conquered
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒŋkəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːŋkərd//
     
    past participle conquered
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒŋkəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːŋkərd//
     
    -ing form conquering
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒŋkərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːŋkərɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1conquer somebody/something to take control of a country or city and its people by force The Normans conquered England in 1066. In 330 BC Persia was conquered by Alexander the Great. conquered peoples/races/territories
  2. 2conquer somebody to defeat somebody, especially in a competition, race, etc. The world champion conquered yet another challenger last night.
  3. 3conquer something to succeed in dealing with or controlling something The only way to conquer a fear is to face it. Mount Everest was conquered (= successfully climbed) in 1953.
  4. 4conquer something to become very popular or successful in a place The band is now setting out to conquer the world.
  5. Word Origin Middle English (also in the general sense ‘acquire, attain’): from Old French conquerre, based on Latin conquirere ‘gain, win’, from con- (expressing completion) + quaerere ‘seek’.Extra examples He will need to conquer his nerves to progress in this competition. The Roman empire offered citizenship to its conquered peoples. This is a British film which could conquer the US market.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: conquer

Other results

All matches