Definition of continue verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    continue

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kənˈtɪnjuː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈtɪnjuː//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they continue
    BrE BrE//kənˈtɪnjuː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈtɪnjuː//
     
    he / she / it continues
    BrE BrE//kənˈtɪnjuːz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈtɪnjuːz//
     
    past simple continued
    BrE BrE//kənˈtɪnjuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈtɪnjuːd//
     
    past participle continued
    BrE BrE//kənˈtɪnjuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈtɪnjuːd//
     
    -ing form continuing
    BrE BrE//kənˈtɪnjuːɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈtɪnjuːɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to keep existing or happening without stopping The exhibition continues until 25 July. The trial is expected to continue for three months. The rain will continue into the evening. continue to do something The rain continued to fall all afternoon. The number of car accident deaths is continuing to decline. continue doing something The rain continued falling all afternoon.
  2. 2  [intransitive, transitive] to keep doing something without stopping continue doing something She wanted to continue working until she was 60. He vowed to continue fighting. continue to do something He continued to ignore everything I was saying. continue (with something) Are you going to continue with the project? continue something The board of inquiry is continuing its investigations.
  3. 3  [intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) to go or move further in the same direction The path continued over rough, rocky ground. He continued on his way.
  4. 4  [intransitive] continue (as something) to remain in a particular job or condition I want you to continue as project manager. She will continue in her present job until a replacement can be found.
  5. 5  [intransitive, transitive] to start or start something again after stopping for a time synonym resume The story continues in our next issue. continue something The story will be continued in our next issue.
  6. 6  [intransitive, transitive] to start speaking again after stopping Please continue—I didn't mean to interrupt. + speech ‘In fact,’ he continued, ‘I'd like to congratulate you.’
  7. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French continuer, from Latin continuare, from continuus ‘uninterrupted’, from continere ‘hang together’ (from con- ‘together with’ + tenere ‘hold’).Extra examples The process continued throughout the day. The road continues through the village of Knightwick. We need your support to enable us to continue with our work. Work continued until nightfall. Work on the new road is expected to continue for another two months. ‘In fact,’ he continued, ‘I’d like to congratulate you.’ Please continue with the work you were doing before. Please continue—I didn’t mean to interrupt. She wanted to continue working after the baby was born. The board of enquiry is continuing its investigations. The path continued over rocky ground.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: continue