English

Definition of contradict verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    contradict

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˌkɒntrəˈdɪkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːntrəˈdɪkt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they contradict
    BrE BrE//ˌkɒntrəˈdɪkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːntrəˈdɪkt//
     
    he / she / it contradicts
    BrE BrE//ˌkɒntrəˈdɪkts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːntrəˈdɪkts//
     
    past simple contradicted
    BrE BrE//ˌkɒntrəˈdɪktɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːntrəˈdɪktɪd//
     
    past participle contradicted
    BrE BrE//ˌkɒntrəˈdɪktɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːntrəˈdɪktɪd//
     
    -ing form contradicting
    BrE BrE//ˌkɒntrəˈdɪktɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌkɑːntrəˈdɪktɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1to say that something that somebody else has said is wrong, and that the opposite is true contradict something All evening her husband contradicted everything she said. contradict somebody/yourself You've just contradicted yourself (= said the opposite of what you said before). contradict (somebody) + speech ‘No, it’s not,’ she contradicted (him).
  2. 2contradict something | contradict each other (of statements or pieces of evidence) to be so different from each other that one of them must be wrong The two stories contradict each other. This version of events was contradicted by eye-witness reports. Language BankevidenceGiving proof There is clear evidence that TV advertising influences what children buy. It is clear from numerous studies that TV advertising influences what children buy. Recent research demonstrates that TV advertising influences children’s spending habits. Many parents think that TV advertising influences their children. This view is supported by the findings of a recent study, which show a clear link between television advertisements and children’s spending habits. The findings also reveal that most children are unaware of the persuasive purpose of advertising. There is little evidence that children understand the persuasive intent of advertising. The results contradict claims that advertising is unrelated to children’s spending habits. Manufacturers argue that it is difficult to prove that advertising alone influences what children buy.
  3. Word Origin late 16th cent.: from Latin contradict- ‘spoken against’, from the verb contradicere, originally contra dicere ‘speak against’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: contradict