Definition of convert verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    convert

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kənˈvɜːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈvɜːrt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they convert
    BrE BrE//kənˈvɜːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈvɜːrt//
     
    he / she / it converts
    BrE BrE//kənˈvɜːts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈvɜːrts//
     
    past simple converted
    BrE BrE//kənˈvɜːtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈvɜːrtɪd//
     
    past participle converted
    BrE BrE//kənˈvɜːtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈvɜːrtɪd//
     
    -ing form converting
    BrE BrE//kənˈvɜːtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈvɜːrtɪŋ//
     
    Cost and payment, Rugby
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] to change or make something change from one form, purpose, system, etc. to another convert something (into something) The hotel is going to be converted into a nursing home. The pub is a converted warehouse. What rate will I get if I convert my dollars into euros? Hot water is converted to electricity by a turbine. convert (from something) (into/to something) We've converted from oil to gas central heating. See related entries: Cost and payment
  2. 2  [intransitive] convert into/to something to be able to be changed from one form, purpose, or system to another a sofa that converts into a bed
  3. 3  [intransitive, transitive] to change or make somebody change their religion or beliefs convert (from something) (to something) He converted from Christianity to Islam. convert somebody (from something) (to something) She was soon converted to the socialist cause.
  4. 4[intransitive, transitive] to change an opinion, a habit, etc. convert (from something) to something I've converted to organic food. convert somebody (from something) (to something) I didn't use to like opera but my husband has converted me.
  5. 5[transitive] convert something (in rugby and American football) to score extra points after a try or a touchdown See related entries: Rugby
  6. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘turn round, send in a different direction’): from Old French convertir, based on Latin convertere ‘turn about’, from con- ‘altogether’ + vertere ‘turn’.Extra examples All homes must convert to digital TV by 2012, when the analogue signal will be switched off. I’ve converted to organic food. I’ve never liked opera but you might convert me! The Prime Minister was in favour of the idea but he never managed to convert the party. They live in a converted church/​barn/​mill. We need a sofa that converts into a bed. We’ve converted from coal to gas central heating. to convert a church/​farm buildings/​a barn/​a house/​stables/​a mill (into something) to convert securities into sharesIdioms
    preach to the converted
     
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    to speak to people in support of views that they already hold
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: convert

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