Definition of convey verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    convey

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kənˈveɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈveɪ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they convey
    BrE BrE//kənˈveɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈveɪ//
     
    he / she / it conveys
    BrE BrE//kənˈveɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈveɪz//
     
    past simple conveyed
    BrE BrE//kənˈveɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈveɪd//
     
    past participle conveyed
    BrE BrE//kənˈveɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈveɪd//
     
    -ing form conveying
    BrE BrE//kənˈveɪɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kənˈveɪɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1to make ideas, feelings, etc. known to somebody synonym communicate convey something Colours like red convey a sense of energy and strength. convey something to somebody (formal) Please convey my apologies to your wife. convey how, what, etc… He tried desperately to convey how urgent the situation was. convey that… She did not wish to convey that they were all at fault.
  2. 2convey somebody/something (from…) (to…) (formal) to take, carry or transport somebody/something from one place to another Pipes convey hot water from the boiler to the radiators. A carriage was waiting to convey her home.
  3. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘escort’; compare with convoy): from Old French conveier, from medieval Latin conviare, from con- ‘together’ + Latin via ‘way’.Extra examples He managed to convey his enthusiasm to her. The novel vividly conveys the experience of growing up during the war. Flowers from the Isles of Scilly were conveyed by steamer to Penzance. Pipes convey hot water to the radiators. The stone was conveyed by river to the site.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: convey