Definition of cram verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    cram

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kræm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kræm//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they cram
    BrE BrE//kræm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kræm//
     
    he / she / it crams
    BrE BrE//kræmz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kræmz//
     
    past simple crammed
    BrE BrE//kræmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kræmd//
     
    past participle crammed
    BrE BrE//kræmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kræmd//
     
    -ing form cramming
    BrE BrE//ˈkræmɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkræmɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] to push or force somebody/something into a small space; to move into a small space with the result that it is full cram somebody/something into/onto something He crammed eight people into his car. cram something in I could never cram in all that she does in a day. cram something + adv./prep. I managed to cram down a few mouthfuls of food. cram something Supporters crammed the streets. cram something full I bought a large basket and crammed it full of presents. cram into/onto something We all managed to cram into his car.
  2. 2[intransitive] cram (for something) (North American English, informal or rather old-fashioned, British English) to learn a lot of things in a short time, in preparation for an exam synonym swot He's been cramming for his exams all week.
  3. Word Origin Old English crammian, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch krammen ‘to cramp or clamp’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: cram