English

Definition of daunt verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

daunt

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//dɔːnt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɔːnt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they daunt
BrE BrE//dɔːnt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɔːnt//
 
he / she / it daunts
BrE BrE//dɔːnts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɔːnts//
 
past simple daunted
BrE BrE//ˈdɔːntɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɔːntɪd//
 
past participle daunted
BrE BrE//ˈdɔːntɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɔːntɪd//
 
-ing form daunting
BrE BrE//ˈdɔːntɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɔːntɪŋ//
 
 
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  • [usually passive] daunt somebody to make somebody feel nervous and less confident about doing something synonym intimidate She was a brave woman but she felt daunted by the task ahead. She had struggled with problems that would daunt the most energetic and resourceful of people. The prospect of going in a helicopter rather daunts me.
  • Word Origin Middle English: from Old French danter, from Latin domitare, frequentative of domare ‘to tame’.Idioms (British English, formal) confident about something difficult you have to do Nothing daunted, the people set about rebuilding their homes.
    See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: daunt