Definition of demolish verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    demolish

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈmɒlɪʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈmɑːlɪʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they demolish
    BrE BrE//ˈmɒlɪʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈmɑːlɪʃ//
     
    he / she / it demolishes
    BrE BrE//dɪˈmɒlɪʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈmɑːlɪʃɪz//
     
    past simple demolished
    BrE BrE//dɪˈmɒlɪʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈmɑːlɪʃt//
     
    past participle demolished
    BrE BrE//dɪˈmɒlɪʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈmɑːlɪʃt//
     
    -ing form demolishing
    BrE BrE//dɪˈmɒlɪʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈmɑːlɪʃɪŋ//
     
    Experiments and research, Construction, Hunger
     
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  1. 1demolish something to pull or knock down a building The factory is due to be demolished next year. See related entries: Construction
  2. 2demolish something to destroy something accidentally The car had skidded across the road and demolished part of the wall.
  3. 3demolish something to show that an idea or theory is completely wrong A recent book has demolished this theory. See related entries: Experiments and research
  4. 4demolish somebody/something to defeat somebody easily and completely They demolished New Zealand 44–6 in the final.
  5. 5demolish something (British English, informal) to eat something very quickly The children demolished their burgers and chips. See related entries: Hunger
  6. Word Origin mid 16th cent.: from French démoliss-, lengthened stem of démolir, from Latin demoliri, from de- (expressing reversal) + moliri ‘construct’ (from moles ‘mass’).Extra examples He has successfully demolished the opposition’s arguments. The old slums are being demolished to make way for a new housing project. Tornadoes demolished trailers and blew roofs off houses.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: demolish