Definition of derive verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

    

derive

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//dɪˈraɪv//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈraɪv//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they derive
BrE BrE//dɪˈraɪv//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈraɪv//
 
he / she / it derives
BrE BrE//dɪˈraɪvz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈraɪvz//
 
past simple derived
BrE BrE//dɪˈraɪvd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈraɪvd//
 
past participle derived
BrE BrE//dɪˈraɪvd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈraɪvd//
 
-ing form deriving
BrE BrE//dɪˈraɪvɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈraɪvɪŋ//
 
 
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Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘draw a fluid through or into a channel’): from Old French deriver or Latin derivare, from de- ‘down, away’ + rivus ‘brook, stream’.Extra examples Children derive great pleasure from sport. Females and cubs clearly derive some benefit from living in groups. This income was derived directly from his writing. We can derive some comfort from this fact. Wealth and position in society derived largely from land ownership. Phrasal Verbsderive from somethingderive something from something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: derive

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